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Why Not Marry, Part Two

Once again, the original Part Two was written on 21 May 2005, about a week after Part One.

I mentioned in Partie Un that a Partie Deux would be coming soon. If you haven't already read Partie Un, I highly recommend reading that first, as much of Partie Deux comes from Partie Un.

All right. Let's continue.

There's one thing about the love plots in the Nanowrimo novels that I forgot to mention in Partie Un. All that love stuff isn't the main point of the story. Seriously. So how did they come about?

A) In Nanowrimo 2002, I wrote half the book in five days--the last five days. By this point I really needed something to happen in the novel in order to keep it going, as my "outline" went only through the main character's nervous breakdown. I sent MC to the coffeeshop. She doesn't fall in love there, but she does finally make friends, including my muse. She finally falls in love during a crisis in the novel and during a crisis in my writing when I was desperate for word count. (Yeah, there we go. I need words. Make the main character fall in love.) The love subplot wasn't even the real story, but the results were significant at the end when she remeets her old life.

What does this say? Love comes when you're not expecting it. Maybe that's what "head over heels" means. That's scary for me; I like to be prepared for things. It's why I carry an umbrella in my purse.

B) This love came in early and disappeared early. I think I told the first few chapters from Trixie's point of view because the first chapter was the main character's funeral, and the rest of the story is a flashback. Either way, we get some interesting insight into Trixie's beliefs, which are significant later when the main character tries to kill her (yes, her best friend!).

So... Why the valedictorian, you ask? Somehow, I think it's because I was giving my own ideal love to Trixie: one of those genius guys. There's a difference here, though. This val actually acknowledges Trixie's existence and actually (gasp) talks to her.

I do find it interesting that both characters in this "love" survive the book. In fact, Trixie even gives the eulogy at the murderer's funeral. That's another story, though.

C) In this novel, I really did transpose my opinions on the main character, except that I'm the sal, not the val. Big deal, right? Wrong. This is another symbol that I always fall for guys who are too good for me--or rather, even smarter. In this book, the val is still moderately friendly to the sal, even returning his feelings in a friendly way, until she realizes that he wants a relationship. She's not ready for that. After all, both of them are leaving that tiny town and going out of state for college [checks... yes, she's going to Penn State; he's going to Duke].

This is yet another symbol of the fear of rejection, especially of someone "better". After all, if you always fall for someone "better", then that fear is either always there or never there, whether you're already friends with that person or not. Note that the val in this story wants her own life, a life that does not include the sal. I'm sure many guys feel the same way, perhaps about inferiors, or even about superiors.