March 30th, 2007

math: hypotamoose

Advising meeting and other sundries

So I met with Dr. Koch this morning to talk about next year's schedule and to get that registration hold removed. (We have to have a meeting with our advisors before registering every semester, for you non-Agnes people.) I showed him my schedules for fall and spring, which contains five math classes, two physics classes, one French class, and the academic/trip component of the Global Connections trip to France, assuming I get accepted to that. Then we started to talk about senior year because according to the draft of math classes, I'll have just two classes left to take at ASC, my senior seminar and complex variables, because I will have taken everything else by then. I can still cross-register for other topics; I already know that I want to do set theory (I've wanted to do this since my first year) and topology, and I'm thinking about adding another semester of analysis, too. Plus I came in with enough hours that I don't have to worry about the maximum hours for a major--you know, the "if you take more than x hours for your major, then you have to take y-x additional hours, where y is the total number of hours you took, and x is the maximum number of hours for your major--I think it's 52, and I'll be hitting that next spring, I think. I can worry about all that later, though. I have next year planned out, anyway, which is good.

Speaking of my schedule, there's no professor name for real analysis. Normally Dr. Lewin teaches it, but this makes me slightly uneasy. Right now I'm just hoping that for some strange reason not everything's in there yet, and she's teaching it anyway. Her classes may be hard (modern geometries this fall will be my third class with her), but I remember just about everything from those classes. So if she doesn't teach analysis I'll be really sad.

Note that I'm conveniently saving my last distributionals (fine arts and that second PE credit) for senior year. Go me.

I also showed my loopiness after the meeting. I left my backpack in the math lobby after my meeting with Dr. Koch and didn't notice until I was back in my room to grab a sweater before stopping by Mollie's for breakfast (it was cold, and I'm a bad judge of weather). So basically, I walked up three flights of stairs before the meeting, three down after the meeting, and repeated this to retrieve my backpack. Wow, I really am loopy.

What else? French was canceled again (wow, going to French on Monday is going to be tough), so I just hung out and did nothing productive. It felt kind of nice, actually. And no one was surprised at lunch when I told them about my life's calling to be a math professor. "You'll be the one who's completely crazy but everyone wants to take your class because you're so crazy," Emily said. "'She's crazy!' 'But should I take her class?' 'Yes! Take it!'"

There was a group of kids on a tour today, and Stephanie asked, "Why don't you want to teach little kids?" Stephanie asked.

"Oh, I love kids as long as they're not related to me," I told her.

"Then why not start a math camp for girls?" Stephanie suggested. "Showing them how awesome math is."

That is an awesome idea. Why? Because I was one of the lucky ones. When I discovered as a child that math was something that I was good at, everyone around me encouraged me at it. When I was going far ahead of everyone else in class, the teachers figured out a way to keep me entertained without causing a ruckus, even though causing a ruckus wasn't my style then anyway--I was perfectly content with reading or playing with numbers more. Now I'd rather do that or cause the ruckus. I got bored in middle school because I wasn't being pushed to the limit. Great, now I have that Cordin Bleu song stuck in my head. Everyone was being taught at one level, and I was bored out of my mind. But I wasn't being brainwashed into thinking that I was terrible at math. I took what I had and bloomed. Maybe I can help others do the same thing--take off their metaphorical blinds and bloom.

**
Now for some random Internet goodies.

Found via metaquotes, we have Raphael/Leonardo art. This is not work-safe, guys. It may not be brain-safe either, but you're talking to the kid who used her brother's Ninja Turtles because she didn't have any Ken dolls. The image is in the link from the entry.

Also, today's XKCD describes me pretty well. I still think there should be a circle of a mathematician wondering, "How can we prove that this happens every time?" Then it would describe me perfectly.

**
Also, there's so much going on that I want to go to, and I still have so much to, well, do. It'll be a good weekend.