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Postmodernism generator is go!

I love generators. Thanks to today's xkcd, I found the Postmodernism Generator. When I accessed the page, I found this.


Constructivism in the works of Gibson
Z. Thomas Wilson
Department of Literature, University of California, Berkeley

1. Postdialectic narrative and semioticist discourse

“Society is unattainable,” says Lacan; however, according to Brophy[1] , it is not so much society that is unattainable, but rather the genre, and eventually the meaninglessness, of society. However, Lacan suggests the use of semioticist discourse to attack sexism. Sontag uses the term ‘constructivism’ to denote the role of the poet as observer.

“Reality is part of the failure of art,” says Sartre. But the primary theme of von Junz’s[2] analysis of subtextual narrative is the common ground between sexual identity and class. Semioticist discourse states that sexual identity, somewhat ironically, has significance.

In the works of Rushdie, a predominant concept is the distinction between ground and figure. However, the subject is interpolated into a that includes narrativity as a paradox. Bataille uses the term ‘neodialectic deconstructivism’ to denote the absurdity, and some would say the meaninglessness, of constructive art.

“Society is used in the service of capitalism,” says Debord. Thus, Reicher[3] suggests that we have to choose between constructivism and cultural precapitalist theory. Sontag uses the term ‘dialectic materialism’ to denote the difference between narrativity and society.

It could be said that if subtextual narrative holds, we have to choose between semioticist discourse and postdeconstructive discourse. The premise of subtextual narrative states that the media is capable of truth.

In a sense, Derrida promotes the use of constructivism to read and analyse class. Subtextual narrative suggests that reality has objective value.

It could be said that the subject is contextualised into a that includes consciousness as a reality. Debord suggests the use of semioticist discourse to challenge hierarchy.

Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a that includes truth as a totality. Sartre uses the term ’semioticist discourse’ to denote not construction, as Bataille would have it, but subconstruction.

However, a number of desituationisms concerning the common ground between class and society exist. The premise of subtextual narrative holds that context must come from communication, given that Marxist capitalism is valid.

2. Narratives of absurdity

“Narrativity is fundamentally a legal fiction,” says Lacan; however, according to Pickett[4] , it is not so much narrativity that is fundamentally a legal fiction, but rather the paradigm, and subsequent dialectic, of narrativity. But Scuglia[5] states that we have to choose between constructivism and semantic neocultural theory. In Finnegan’s Wake, Joyce deconstructs subtextual narrative; in Dubliners, however, he examines deconstructive feminism.

“Sexual identity is used in the service of capitalism,” says Foucault. Therefore, Derrida promotes the use of subtextual narrative to modify society. The subject is contextualised into a that includes sexuality as a reality.

If one examines submaterialist dialectic theory, one is faced with a choice: either accept constructivism or conclude that narrativity, perhaps paradoxically, has intrinsic meaning. Thus, Lyotard uses the term ’subtextual narrative’ to denote a postcultural whole. The subject is interpolated into a that includes art as a totality.

It could be said that any number of appropriations concerning constructivism may be discovered. If semioticist discourse holds, the works of Joyce are reminiscent of Eco.

However, the subject is contextualised into a that includes narrativity as a paradox. Abian[6] implies that we have to choose between subtextual narrative and deconstructive libertarianism.

Therefore, the main theme of the works of Joyce is the difference between society and sexual identity. If semioticist discourse holds, we have to choose between constructivism and the poststructuralist paradigm of expression.

But the subject is interpolated into a that includes consciousness as a reality. Many theories concerning a mythopoetical whole exist.

It could be said that the primary theme of Tilton’s[7] critique of subtextual narrative is the paradigm, and some would say the meaninglessness, of textual art. Sartre suggests the use of semioticist discourse to deconstruct sexism.

1. Brophy, C. ed. (1998) Deconstructing Derrida: Constructivism and subtextual narrative. University of Oregon Press

2. von Junz, O. U. M. (1974) Constructivism in the works of Rushdie. O’Reilly & Associates

3. Reicher, A. ed. (1990) Postdialectic Theories: Subtextual narrative in the works of Tarantino. Harvard University Press

4. Pickett, D. N. (1972) Subtextual narrative and constructivism. Panic Button Books

5. Scuglia, K. ed. (1991) Forgetting Baudrillard: Subtextual narrative in the works of Joyce. University of Illinois Press

6. Abian, W. B. (1986) Neostructuralist discourse, constructivism and capitalism. O’Reilly & Associates

7. Tilton, D. ed. (1977) The Vermillion Door: Constructivism and subtextual narrative. University of Georgia Press

Oh, postmodernism, I love you.

Comments

( 4 comments — Leave a comment )
banyangirl1832
Jul. 19th, 2008 02:12 am (UTC)
Dude, I'm an English major and I just chalked that up to "tl;dr."
sushimustwrite
Jul. 19th, 2008 02:27 am (UTC)
Good, because this really is gibberish. :)
poisonedwriter
Jul. 19th, 2008 03:18 am (UTC)
I am an English major. I clicked the lj-cut, thought, "I don't want to read that academic blather," and left a comment. w00t.
(Deleted comment)
( 4 comments — Leave a comment )