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Osama bin Laden is dead

For those just tuning into the Internet, Osama bin Laden is dead. The news leaked on Twitter while everyone waited for a last-minute announcement from President Obama. A tweet from Keith Urbahn was the first reliable source to give an idea for the topic.

So I'm told by a reputable person they have killed Osama Bin Laden. Hot damn. He followed this by "Don't know if its true, but let's pray it is." (Source) Good to know he realized how much power that tweet had, but by then all of Twitter had picked up on it, and 10:30 came and went without a word from Obama.

And then Twitter exploded in hilarity. If someone asks where I was when I found out Osama was dead, I'll tell them I was drowning in Twitter hilarity. More retweets showed up on my feed than regular tweets from people I follow, and the laughs kept coming in. They're still coming in. Times like this and the couple of people who accidentally livetweeted the attack are why the Library of Congress is archiving tweets.

Obama finally made his statement over an hour past the 11:30 scheduled time, and from what the Internet said, he wrote it himself. He should do it more often if that's the case; I enjoyed this speech more than any other speech of his, and the first time I heard him speak was in 2007 (and that one was in person). The most notable quote from the speech:

"[T]he United States is not –- and never will be -– at war with Islam. I’ve made clear, just as President Bush did shortly after 9/11, that our war is not against Islam. Bin Laden was not a Muslim leader; he was a mass murderer of Muslims."

Thank you for saying that, Mr. President.

There's only one thing I can't get behind, and that's celebrating his death. I'm not a fan of celebrating anyone's death, even someone who did deeds like the ones bin Laden did. Death is an end of life and existence, and using death before capturing bin Laden and making him stand a trial at the very least is wrong in my eyes. The end of a regime is to be celebrated, and rightly so.

Things won't change immediately, if they ever change. You'll still have to choose the pornoscanner or the grope if you travel through an American airport tomorrow and likely will for a long time. There's still concern for a possible attack. And of course, those who have lost someone through bin Laden's actions, directly or indirectly, will still feel the pain of the loss but may feel some relief at his death. Change is slow to come, and all we can do is do our part to create a better tomorrow.

Comments

( 6 comments — Leave a comment )
moonglade_swan
May. 2nd, 2011 02:41 am (UTC)
Since my film professor is really into government conspiracy theories this semester, I'm sure I'm going to be hearing about this all day long tomorrow.
sushimustwrite
May. 2nd, 2011 12:16 pm (UTC)
I bet that's a fun class. :P
moonglade_swan
May. 3rd, 2011 08:19 am (UTC)
Surprisingly, I didn't hear a word about it, but that may have been because I accidentally slept through my alarm, completely missed my first class, and was late to my second class.

I did hear him mention Obama's fake birth certificate though.
shipwreck_light
May. 2nd, 2011 03:04 am (UTC)
Honestly, there is little I enjoy more than celebrating the demise of a right douche. But, I can totally understand feeling that this is not the best course of action, and can keep my noisemakers to myself.

*fweeeeeeeeet*

Ahem. Bad kitty.

That said? That would have been one hell of a trial and I can only hope one of my permutations in another universe appreciates it for what it is. That oh-so rare period of time wherein justice MIGHT KINDA SORTA ACTUALLY HAPPEN.

I wonder if other-SWL also considered licking those new Nebula beads from Miyuki.
sushimustwrite
May. 2nd, 2011 12:17 pm (UTC)
I can't blame you for celebrating. By all means, go ahead. I just can't celebrate with a good conscience.

And that definitely would have been one hell of a trial. It would have to be short, too, to keep Osama from escaping.
cwtyger
May. 2nd, 2011 05:34 pm (UTC)
The one problem with putting someone like Osama on trial is how do you guarantee it will be fair? Everyone in the United States has been conditioned to think of Osama as Satan's right hand man. How do you find twelve people who are willing to be impartial so that they can serve on his jury? We're all told on the news about how guilty he was, but if he entered the legal system, he'd have to be presumed innocent until they can prove him guilty. In a way, killing him in battle is better than putting him into a kangaroo court, because that's basically what it'll be. Send enough planes into buildings and kill enough people and there's no way that you'll ever get a fair trial. Saddam Hussein's trial was a farce: everyone knew he was going to be executed for all that he did, and he was.

I wish I could celebrate the death of my enemies like that. But here's the thing: they weren't my enemies. (Well, they were, but not directly.) They were the media's enemies. Like I said, the news would often report how evil Osama was. It got so that I didn't care. He made one attack on the United States and then he's been unable to do anything since then except make videos and hide. And now that he's toast, I bet all the news agencies will be scrambling to look for their next target. Colonel Gaddafi in Libya might be a feasible target for the media until he finally buys it (won't be long now, folks). Fidel Castro retired. We're running out of vilifyable world leaders who don't have access to nukes.
( 6 comments — Leave a comment )